Vagabond Operatic

heyhearmenow:

bobak:

hydrogeneportfolio:

Minimal Posters - Six Women Who Changed Science. And The World.

Love.

This is so great ya’ll

(via loveispigeon)

21 October 2014 reblog: hydrogeneportfolio


21 October 2014 reblog: askthesciencebros


itsstuckyinmyhead:

Best Tumblr Responses 

(via azriona)

21 October 2014 reblog: itsstuckyinmyhead


gohomeluhan:

As I’m walking through Target with my little sister, the kid somehow manages to convince me to take a trip down the doll aisle. I know the type - brands that preach diversity through displays of nine different variations of white and maybe a black girl if you’re lucky enough. What I instead found as soon as I turned into the aisle were these two boxes.

The girl on the left is Shola, an Afghani girl from Kabul with war-torn eyes. Her biography on the inside flap tells us that “her country has been at war since before she was born”, and all she has left of her family is her older sister. They’re part of a circus, the one source of light in their lives, and they read the Qur’an. She wears a hijab.

The girl on the right is Nahji, a ten-year-old Indian girl from Assam, where “young girls are forced to work and get married at a very early age”. Nahji is smart, admirable, extremely studious. She teaches her fellow girls to believe in themselves. In the left side of her nose, as tradition mandates, she has a piercing. On her right hand is a henna tattoo.

As a Pakistani girl growing up in post-9/11 America, this is so important to me. The closest thing we had to these back in my day were “customizable” American Girl dolls, who were very strictly white or black. My eyes are green, my hair was black, and my skin is brown, and I couldn’t find my reflection in any of those girls. Yet I settled, just like I settled for the terrorist jokes boys would throw at me, like I settled for the butchered pronunciations of names of mine and my friends’ countries. I settled for a white doll, who at least had my eyes if nothing else, and I named her Rabeea and loved her. But I still couldn’t completely connect to her.

My little sister, who had been the one to push me down the aisle in the first place, stopped to stare with me at the girls. And then the words, “Maybe they can be my American Girls,” slipped out of her mouth. This young girl, barely represented in today’s society, finally found a doll that looks like her, that wears the weird headscarf that her grandma does and still manages to look beautiful.

I turned the dolls’ boxes around and snapped a picture of the back of Nahji’s. There are more that I didn’t see in the store; a Belarusian, an Ethiopian, a Brazilian, a Laotian, a Native American, a Mexican. And more.

These are Hearts 4 Hearts dolls, and while they haven’t yet reached all parts of the world (I think they have yet to come out with an East Asian girl), they need all the support they can get so we can have a beautiful doll for every beautiful young girl, so we can give them what our generation never had.

Please don’t let this die. If you know a young girl, get her one. I know I’m buying Shola and Nahji for my little sister’s next birthday, because she needs a doll with beautiful brown skin like hers, a doll who wears a hijab like our older sister, a doll who wears real henna, not the blue shit white girls get at the beach.

The Hearts 4 Hearts girls are so important. Don’t overlook them. Don’t underestimate them. These can be the future if we let them.

You can read more about the dolls here: http://www.playmatestoys.com/brands/hearts-for-hearts-girls

(via valeria2067)

20 October 2014 reblog: gohomeluhan


traveltobeprovedwrong:

deveninanewdress:

cutthroatchorus:

wickedclothes:

Bra With Pockets

This functional bra can hold most cellphones, IDs, and other small items regardless of bust size. Items won’t change the way the bra fits you. Currently on sale at Amazon!

OK I REALLY WANT TO BE KISSING A GIRL AND THEN I TAKE OFF MY SHIRT AND SHE’S LIKE “CUTE BRA” AND I CAN SAY “THANKS IT HAS POCKETS”

the game has changed forever

THIS IS THE BEST IDEA EVER

(via professorspork)

20 October 2014 reblog: wickedclothes


shes-a-voodoo-child:

last-snowfall:

initiala:

tygermama:

last-snowfall:

tygermama:

last-snowfall:

Steve Rogers as a guest on Sesame Street. With Super Grover.

YEEESSSSSS

"Hi, I’m Captain Steve Rogers - "

"And I am SUUPER GROVEEER! *CRASH* … I meant to do that.”

" …and we’re here to talk to you about the word ‘responsibility.’"

And after Tony and Clint tease Steve, asking him for Kermit’s autograph

Until two autographed pics show up

I want to take a moment to imagine all of the Avengers making an appearance on Sesame Street. This is very important to me.

It doesn’t take much for Steve to get on board with this. He’s THRILLED with easy public access television for children, especially when he learns that the original concept for Sesame Street came from creators wanting to target urban kids who might not have access to early learning because of their money status. Steve, in fact, makes multiple appearances on Sesame Street. He finds ways to help support them, and increasing support for international versions of Sesame Street. (he’s also made an appearance or two on the PBS funding drive circuit)

Once he finds out how popular his episodes are, he talks the others into going on.

Thor is also really easy to get on board, though at first the creative team isn’t so sure what to do with him. Then Thor opens up about Loki, so they do a special with Baby Bear and Curly Bear about the importance of always being open and honest with your siblings. Thor also inspires the creative team to come up with Muppet characters who are adopted or foster children, as they’ve been lacking in that area.

Bruce is hesitant at first, especially since his experiences aren’t always relatable to children. Steve brings him to the creative team, and he’s presented with a special with Big Bird. Big Bird breaks Susan Robinson’s new flower pots, and Bruce tells him about how sometimes big mistakes happen, but you have to be honest with the people around you, and they’ll still love you in the end. Bruce doesn’t find out that Natasha is the one who suggested the theme.

Clint is a little wary at first, but then decides to just go for it. He tells the creative team that he’ll be up for anything, and so his episode is also the introductory episode for a new deaf Muppet, a little girl named Francis who loves books.

Tony and Natasha are both adamant about not appearing on the show; neither one of them are good enough for it. Tony makes as many excuses as he can; he even throws multiple fundraisers to put enough funds into the Sesame Workshop’s accounts to help them through the next decade or so. But Steve is relentless, showing him pictures of kids in homemade Iron Man suits, telling him how important it is for kids to see their heroes be relatable. Finally, Tony agrees, and he teaches Elmo what the word “science” means.

And then there’s Natasha. Steve has to work on her for almost two years, following his first appearance on the show, and she keeps putting it down. She’s not a role model for kids, she’s got a terrible past, no one should be like her; Steve hears every excuse in the books, but all he hears is more reasons for her to go on. Natasha tells him that little girls who might be in her old shoes aren’t watching public access TV. Steve tells her it doesn’t matter, girls of all ages need to hear her talk. Finally, mostly to shut him up, Natasha agrees, and she’s given a special with Abby Cadabby, Zoe, and Rosita; they talk about how no matter what happens to you in life, you can always change what happens to you as long as you’re brave enough.

After Natasha’s episode airs, the team is called down to the studio, and they get a group picture with all of the cast and the Muppets. Each one of the team keeps that photo somewhere secret.

A+ excellent addition would reblog again. (“Mr Tony! Mr Mr Mr Tony!” “Yeah?” “What is the difference between doing science and making a mess?” “Well, Elmo, there is one important difference. With science, you write down what happened, and do it again.”)

I can’t hear you, my heart just grew three sizes.

(via professorspork)

20 October 2014 reblog: last-snowfall


johnflansburgh:

johnflansburgh:

did dwayne johnson ever have like, a rebellious phase? was he ever super anti-establishment do you think

i guess what i’m asking is if there was ever a punk rock

(via professorspork)

20 October 2014 reblog: johnflansburgh


-imaginarythoughts-:

justsmilestuffhappens:

rennoc92:

volunt-spei:

iwantasnack:

taengthehero:

The water bottle sold me. Very nice touch.


WHAT IS THIS MY BRAIN DOES NOT COMPREHEND IT.

Turn your head sideways.

forced perspective photography?

Oh shit..

-imaginarythoughts-:

justsmilestuffhappens:

rennoc92:

volunt-spei:

iwantasnack:

taengthehero:

The water bottle sold me. Very nice touch.

WHAT IS THIS MY BRAIN DOES NOT COMPREHEND IT.

Turn your head sideways.

forced perspective photography?

Oh shit..

(Source: yepperoni, via professorspork)

20 October 2014 reblog: yepperoni


(Source: fyeahtaylor, via wilwheaton)

20 October 2014 reblog: fyeahtaylor


firelorcl:

vortexanomaly:

the crumb

this is the most intense photo i’ve ever seen

firelorcl:

vortexanomaly:

the crumb

this is the most intense photo i’ve ever seen

(Source: nickholmes, via sketchlock)

20 October 2014 reblog: nickholmes